Grazing cattle for human health and the global environment

For more than a decade  I’ve been working to establish a model for 100% grass-fed beef production that will restore grasslands and provide healthy food for humans and a fair financial return for farmers.

Now, in the world of concern over climate change, worn out farmland, droughts, human health problems, and the impacts of industrial beef production, a movement is growing to address all these problems by raising cattle for market on pasture alone—no feedlot and no corn, ever.  And because grazing can also be used to restore cropland to health and fertility, and even to reverse desertification, the shift toward meat production based on natural systems has implications for feeding world populations.

Both examples above show a color contrast between adjacent fields.  In each, the darker green reflects increased health and volume of grass from rotational grazing, and the lighter green reflects the results of conventional management.

Both examples above show a color contrast between adjacent fields. In each, the darker green reflects increased health and volume of grass from rotational grazing, and the lighter green reflects the results of conventional management.

 

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